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Bon Appétit Lists Tastemakers for 2012

Bon Appétit Lists Tastemakers for 2012

Bon Appétit’s March issue will debut their inaugural list of tastemakers, naming 26 people who have a constant hand in what we eat and where we eat it. The magazine’s editor-in-chief, Adam Rapoport, feels that "good taste is about more than just great recipes, it’s about people, too. So let’s toast the butchers, the bakers, the artisanal cheesemakers, and the playboy hotelier who is now busy raising chickens."

So who made the list for 2012?

Alice Waters and unlikely partner in all-things-gardening Jake Gyllenhaal made the list under the category "Garden Revolutionaries" for their work helping schools grow and eat natural, fresh foods. Then, they named Michael Kors to the list because of his endlessly chic and cool travels around the globe. He’s contributed to stories for everyone from Bon Appétit to Travel + Leisure, giving tips on where to eat in Capri, Italy, and beyond.

From there, they include Ignacio Mattos and Taavo Somer, the restaurateurs who recently opened the avant-garde Brooklyn eatery Isa, as well as Chad Robertson, the baker behind the beloved Tartine Bakery in San Francisco. They also laud the efforts of Paul Greenberg, the ultimate advocate for eating sustainable fish, as well as the efforts of Pippa Lord, who started SousStyle.com, a seriously cool blog featuring pictures and stories of hip young people cooking in their apartments around the world.

And of course, they included the sudden locavore André Balazs, who recently bought a farm in upstate New York and is raising chickens that he’s supplying to The Standard Grill in New York City.

How does their Tastemakers list compare to our list of the most powerful people in food?


Following racism controversy, Bon Appétit names top ranking book editor Dawn Davis as its new editor-in-chief

One of the book publishing industry’s highest ranking Black executives is moving on to the magazine world.

Dawn Davis, the award-winning vice president and publisher of Simon & Schuster’s 37 Ink imprint has been named the new editor-in-chief of Bon Appétit.

According to the top culinary periodical’s publisher, Condé Nast, Davis will be responsible for the editorial vision of Bon Appétit and the company’s food brands Epicurious, Healthyish and Basically across digital, video, Over The Top advertising, social and print platforms.

The appointment follows the June resignation of longtime editor in chief Adam Rapoport after photos surfaced of him in brownface at a 2013 party, amid accusations that the magazine only pays white editors for video appearances – a claim that Conde Nast vehemently denied.

On June 10, the company apologized and committed to creating change following the racism allegations.

In a public statement titled “A Long-Overdue Apology, and Where We Go From Here,” the company promised to prioritize people of color for consideration for the editor in chief position left open by Rapoport’s departure.

It also committed to anti-racism training for the staff and to resolve pay inequities.

Bon Appétit also said it will hire more freelancers of color.

Davis, who’s scheduled to start working Nov. 2, has worked in book publishing for more than 25 years and founded the 37 Ink imprint in 2013, with a focus on shining light on marginalized voices.

Some of her bestselling and award-winning titles include “Heads of the Colored People” by Nafissa Thompson-Spires, winner of a 2019 Whiting Award the National Book Award finalist, “Never Caught: The Washingtons’ Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge” by Erica Armstrong Dunbar and several New York Times bestsellers, including “Tough Love: My Story of the Things Worth Fighting For” by Susan Rice “The Butler: A Witness to History” by Wil Haygood “The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl” by Issa Rae and “I Can’t Make This Up” by Kevin Hart.

“A proven trailblazer in publishing and known for her innovative approach, Dawn’s ability to find emerging voices and give them the platforms to transform our society is unparalleled,” Condé Nast CEO Roger Lynch said. “As she joins Bon Appétit with one of the most passionate and engaged audiences in the culinary world, it’s thrilling to think about how our relationship with food will be enhanced through her leadership and vision.”

Davis will report to longtime Vogue editrix Anna Wintour, who also serves as artistic director of Condé Nast U.S. and global content advisor for the company. The media giant also publishes The New Yorker, GQ and Vanity Fair.

“Dawn’s work stands out for defining and leading important cultural conversations,” Wintour said with the announcement. “She is a trusted voice and supporter of a diverse and inclusive community of writers and she has shone a light on people and stories that need to be told. I am so pleased that she will bring her considerable talent to Bon Appétit.”

A native of Los Angeles, Davis will be one of very few Black people to ever helm a Condé Nast publication. The first was Keija Minor, the editor in chief of Brides from 2012 to 2017.


Following racism controversy, Bon Appétit names top ranking book editor Dawn Davis as its new editor-in-chief

One of the book publishing industry’s highest ranking Black executives is moving on to the magazine world.

Dawn Davis, the award-winning vice president and publisher of Simon & Schuster’s 37 Ink imprint has been named the new editor-in-chief of Bon Appétit.

According to the top culinary periodical’s publisher, Condé Nast, Davis will be responsible for the editorial vision of Bon Appétit and the company’s food brands Epicurious, Healthyish and Basically across digital, video, Over The Top advertising, social and print platforms.

The appointment follows the June resignation of longtime editor in chief Adam Rapoport after photos surfaced of him in brownface at a 2013 party, amid accusations that the magazine only pays white editors for video appearances – a claim that Conde Nast vehemently denied.

On June 10, the company apologized and committed to creating change following the racism allegations.

In a public statement titled “A Long-Overdue Apology, and Where We Go From Here,” the company promised to prioritize people of color for consideration for the editor in chief position left open by Rapoport’s departure.

It also committed to anti-racism training for the staff and to resolve pay inequities.

Bon Appétit also said it will hire more freelancers of color.

Davis, who’s scheduled to start working Nov. 2, has worked in book publishing for more than 25 years and founded the 37 Ink imprint in 2013, with a focus on shining light on marginalized voices.

Some of her bestselling and award-winning titles include “Heads of the Colored People” by Nafissa Thompson-Spires, winner of a 2019 Whiting Award the National Book Award finalist, “Never Caught: The Washingtons’ Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge” by Erica Armstrong Dunbar and several New York Times bestsellers, including “Tough Love: My Story of the Things Worth Fighting For” by Susan Rice “The Butler: A Witness to History” by Wil Haygood “The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl” by Issa Rae and “I Can’t Make This Up” by Kevin Hart.

“A proven trailblazer in publishing and known for her innovative approach, Dawn’s ability to find emerging voices and give them the platforms to transform our society is unparalleled,” Condé Nast CEO Roger Lynch said. “As she joins Bon Appétit with one of the most passionate and engaged audiences in the culinary world, it’s thrilling to think about how our relationship with food will be enhanced through her leadership and vision.”

Davis will report to longtime Vogue editrix Anna Wintour, who also serves as artistic director of Condé Nast U.S. and global content advisor for the company. The media giant also publishes The New Yorker, GQ and Vanity Fair.

“Dawn’s work stands out for defining and leading important cultural conversations,” Wintour said with the announcement. “She is a trusted voice and supporter of a diverse and inclusive community of writers and she has shone a light on people and stories that need to be told. I am so pleased that she will bring her considerable talent to Bon Appétit.”

A native of Los Angeles, Davis will be one of very few Black people to ever helm a Condé Nast publication. The first was Keija Minor, the editor in chief of Brides from 2012 to 2017.


Following racism controversy, Bon Appétit names top ranking book editor Dawn Davis as its new editor-in-chief

One of the book publishing industry’s highest ranking Black executives is moving on to the magazine world.

Dawn Davis, the award-winning vice president and publisher of Simon & Schuster’s 37 Ink imprint has been named the new editor-in-chief of Bon Appétit.

According to the top culinary periodical’s publisher, Condé Nast, Davis will be responsible for the editorial vision of Bon Appétit and the company’s food brands Epicurious, Healthyish and Basically across digital, video, Over The Top advertising, social and print platforms.

The appointment follows the June resignation of longtime editor in chief Adam Rapoport after photos surfaced of him in brownface at a 2013 party, amid accusations that the magazine only pays white editors for video appearances – a claim that Conde Nast vehemently denied.

On June 10, the company apologized and committed to creating change following the racism allegations.

In a public statement titled “A Long-Overdue Apology, and Where We Go From Here,” the company promised to prioritize people of color for consideration for the editor in chief position left open by Rapoport’s departure.

It also committed to anti-racism training for the staff and to resolve pay inequities.

Bon Appétit also said it will hire more freelancers of color.

Davis, who’s scheduled to start working Nov. 2, has worked in book publishing for more than 25 years and founded the 37 Ink imprint in 2013, with a focus on shining light on marginalized voices.

Some of her bestselling and award-winning titles include “Heads of the Colored People” by Nafissa Thompson-Spires, winner of a 2019 Whiting Award the National Book Award finalist, “Never Caught: The Washingtons’ Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge” by Erica Armstrong Dunbar and several New York Times bestsellers, including “Tough Love: My Story of the Things Worth Fighting For” by Susan Rice “The Butler: A Witness to History” by Wil Haygood “The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl” by Issa Rae and “I Can’t Make This Up” by Kevin Hart.

“A proven trailblazer in publishing and known for her innovative approach, Dawn’s ability to find emerging voices and give them the platforms to transform our society is unparalleled,” Condé Nast CEO Roger Lynch said. “As she joins Bon Appétit with one of the most passionate and engaged audiences in the culinary world, it’s thrilling to think about how our relationship with food will be enhanced through her leadership and vision.”

Davis will report to longtime Vogue editrix Anna Wintour, who also serves as artistic director of Condé Nast U.S. and global content advisor for the company. The media giant also publishes The New Yorker, GQ and Vanity Fair.

“Dawn’s work stands out for defining and leading important cultural conversations,” Wintour said with the announcement. “She is a trusted voice and supporter of a diverse and inclusive community of writers and she has shone a light on people and stories that need to be told. I am so pleased that she will bring her considerable talent to Bon Appétit.”

A native of Los Angeles, Davis will be one of very few Black people to ever helm a Condé Nast publication. The first was Keija Minor, the editor in chief of Brides from 2012 to 2017.


Following racism controversy, Bon Appétit names top ranking book editor Dawn Davis as its new editor-in-chief

One of the book publishing industry’s highest ranking Black executives is moving on to the magazine world.

Dawn Davis, the award-winning vice president and publisher of Simon & Schuster’s 37 Ink imprint has been named the new editor-in-chief of Bon Appétit.

According to the top culinary periodical’s publisher, Condé Nast, Davis will be responsible for the editorial vision of Bon Appétit and the company’s food brands Epicurious, Healthyish and Basically across digital, video, Over The Top advertising, social and print platforms.

The appointment follows the June resignation of longtime editor in chief Adam Rapoport after photos surfaced of him in brownface at a 2013 party, amid accusations that the magazine only pays white editors for video appearances – a claim that Conde Nast vehemently denied.

On June 10, the company apologized and committed to creating change following the racism allegations.

In a public statement titled “A Long-Overdue Apology, and Where We Go From Here,” the company promised to prioritize people of color for consideration for the editor in chief position left open by Rapoport’s departure.

It also committed to anti-racism training for the staff and to resolve pay inequities.

Bon Appétit also said it will hire more freelancers of color.

Davis, who’s scheduled to start working Nov. 2, has worked in book publishing for more than 25 years and founded the 37 Ink imprint in 2013, with a focus on shining light on marginalized voices.

Some of her bestselling and award-winning titles include “Heads of the Colored People” by Nafissa Thompson-Spires, winner of a 2019 Whiting Award the National Book Award finalist, “Never Caught: The Washingtons’ Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge” by Erica Armstrong Dunbar and several New York Times bestsellers, including “Tough Love: My Story of the Things Worth Fighting For” by Susan Rice “The Butler: A Witness to History” by Wil Haygood “The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl” by Issa Rae and “I Can’t Make This Up” by Kevin Hart.

“A proven trailblazer in publishing and known for her innovative approach, Dawn’s ability to find emerging voices and give them the platforms to transform our society is unparalleled,” Condé Nast CEO Roger Lynch said. “As she joins Bon Appétit with one of the most passionate and engaged audiences in the culinary world, it’s thrilling to think about how our relationship with food will be enhanced through her leadership and vision.”

Davis will report to longtime Vogue editrix Anna Wintour, who also serves as artistic director of Condé Nast U.S. and global content advisor for the company. The media giant also publishes The New Yorker, GQ and Vanity Fair.

“Dawn’s work stands out for defining and leading important cultural conversations,” Wintour said with the announcement. “She is a trusted voice and supporter of a diverse and inclusive community of writers and she has shone a light on people and stories that need to be told. I am so pleased that she will bring her considerable talent to Bon Appétit.”

A native of Los Angeles, Davis will be one of very few Black people to ever helm a Condé Nast publication. The first was Keija Minor, the editor in chief of Brides from 2012 to 2017.


Following racism controversy, Bon Appétit names top ranking book editor Dawn Davis as its new editor-in-chief

One of the book publishing industry’s highest ranking Black executives is moving on to the magazine world.

Dawn Davis, the award-winning vice president and publisher of Simon & Schuster’s 37 Ink imprint has been named the new editor-in-chief of Bon Appétit.

According to the top culinary periodical’s publisher, Condé Nast, Davis will be responsible for the editorial vision of Bon Appétit and the company’s food brands Epicurious, Healthyish and Basically across digital, video, Over The Top advertising, social and print platforms.

The appointment follows the June resignation of longtime editor in chief Adam Rapoport after photos surfaced of him in brownface at a 2013 party, amid accusations that the magazine only pays white editors for video appearances – a claim that Conde Nast vehemently denied.

On June 10, the company apologized and committed to creating change following the racism allegations.

In a public statement titled “A Long-Overdue Apology, and Where We Go From Here,” the company promised to prioritize people of color for consideration for the editor in chief position left open by Rapoport’s departure.

It also committed to anti-racism training for the staff and to resolve pay inequities.

Bon Appétit also said it will hire more freelancers of color.

Davis, who’s scheduled to start working Nov. 2, has worked in book publishing for more than 25 years and founded the 37 Ink imprint in 2013, with a focus on shining light on marginalized voices.

Some of her bestselling and award-winning titles include “Heads of the Colored People” by Nafissa Thompson-Spires, winner of a 2019 Whiting Award the National Book Award finalist, “Never Caught: The Washingtons’ Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge” by Erica Armstrong Dunbar and several New York Times bestsellers, including “Tough Love: My Story of the Things Worth Fighting For” by Susan Rice “The Butler: A Witness to History” by Wil Haygood “The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl” by Issa Rae and “I Can’t Make This Up” by Kevin Hart.

“A proven trailblazer in publishing and known for her innovative approach, Dawn’s ability to find emerging voices and give them the platforms to transform our society is unparalleled,” Condé Nast CEO Roger Lynch said. “As she joins Bon Appétit with one of the most passionate and engaged audiences in the culinary world, it’s thrilling to think about how our relationship with food will be enhanced through her leadership and vision.”

Davis will report to longtime Vogue editrix Anna Wintour, who also serves as artistic director of Condé Nast U.S. and global content advisor for the company. The media giant also publishes The New Yorker, GQ and Vanity Fair.

“Dawn’s work stands out for defining and leading important cultural conversations,” Wintour said with the announcement. “She is a trusted voice and supporter of a diverse and inclusive community of writers and she has shone a light on people and stories that need to be told. I am so pleased that she will bring her considerable talent to Bon Appétit.”

A native of Los Angeles, Davis will be one of very few Black people to ever helm a Condé Nast publication. The first was Keija Minor, the editor in chief of Brides from 2012 to 2017.


Following racism controversy, Bon Appétit names top ranking book editor Dawn Davis as its new editor-in-chief

One of the book publishing industry’s highest ranking Black executives is moving on to the magazine world.

Dawn Davis, the award-winning vice president and publisher of Simon & Schuster’s 37 Ink imprint has been named the new editor-in-chief of Bon Appétit.

According to the top culinary periodical’s publisher, Condé Nast, Davis will be responsible for the editorial vision of Bon Appétit and the company’s food brands Epicurious, Healthyish and Basically across digital, video, Over The Top advertising, social and print platforms.

The appointment follows the June resignation of longtime editor in chief Adam Rapoport after photos surfaced of him in brownface at a 2013 party, amid accusations that the magazine only pays white editors for video appearances – a claim that Conde Nast vehemently denied.

On June 10, the company apologized and committed to creating change following the racism allegations.

In a public statement titled “A Long-Overdue Apology, and Where We Go From Here,” the company promised to prioritize people of color for consideration for the editor in chief position left open by Rapoport’s departure.

It also committed to anti-racism training for the staff and to resolve pay inequities.

Bon Appétit also said it will hire more freelancers of color.

Davis, who’s scheduled to start working Nov. 2, has worked in book publishing for more than 25 years and founded the 37 Ink imprint in 2013, with a focus on shining light on marginalized voices.

Some of her bestselling and award-winning titles include “Heads of the Colored People” by Nafissa Thompson-Spires, winner of a 2019 Whiting Award the National Book Award finalist, “Never Caught: The Washingtons’ Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge” by Erica Armstrong Dunbar and several New York Times bestsellers, including “Tough Love: My Story of the Things Worth Fighting For” by Susan Rice “The Butler: A Witness to History” by Wil Haygood “The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl” by Issa Rae and “I Can’t Make This Up” by Kevin Hart.

“A proven trailblazer in publishing and known for her innovative approach, Dawn’s ability to find emerging voices and give them the platforms to transform our society is unparalleled,” Condé Nast CEO Roger Lynch said. “As she joins Bon Appétit with one of the most passionate and engaged audiences in the culinary world, it’s thrilling to think about how our relationship with food will be enhanced through her leadership and vision.”

Davis will report to longtime Vogue editrix Anna Wintour, who also serves as artistic director of Condé Nast U.S. and global content advisor for the company. The media giant also publishes The New Yorker, GQ and Vanity Fair.

“Dawn’s work stands out for defining and leading important cultural conversations,” Wintour said with the announcement. “She is a trusted voice and supporter of a diverse and inclusive community of writers and she has shone a light on people and stories that need to be told. I am so pleased that she will bring her considerable talent to Bon Appétit.”

A native of Los Angeles, Davis will be one of very few Black people to ever helm a Condé Nast publication. The first was Keija Minor, the editor in chief of Brides from 2012 to 2017.


Following racism controversy, Bon Appétit names top ranking book editor Dawn Davis as its new editor-in-chief

One of the book publishing industry’s highest ranking Black executives is moving on to the magazine world.

Dawn Davis, the award-winning vice president and publisher of Simon & Schuster’s 37 Ink imprint has been named the new editor-in-chief of Bon Appétit.

According to the top culinary periodical’s publisher, Condé Nast, Davis will be responsible for the editorial vision of Bon Appétit and the company’s food brands Epicurious, Healthyish and Basically across digital, video, Over The Top advertising, social and print platforms.

The appointment follows the June resignation of longtime editor in chief Adam Rapoport after photos surfaced of him in brownface at a 2013 party, amid accusations that the magazine only pays white editors for video appearances – a claim that Conde Nast vehemently denied.

On June 10, the company apologized and committed to creating change following the racism allegations.

In a public statement titled “A Long-Overdue Apology, and Where We Go From Here,” the company promised to prioritize people of color for consideration for the editor in chief position left open by Rapoport’s departure.

It also committed to anti-racism training for the staff and to resolve pay inequities.

Bon Appétit also said it will hire more freelancers of color.

Davis, who’s scheduled to start working Nov. 2, has worked in book publishing for more than 25 years and founded the 37 Ink imprint in 2013, with a focus on shining light on marginalized voices.

Some of her bestselling and award-winning titles include “Heads of the Colored People” by Nafissa Thompson-Spires, winner of a 2019 Whiting Award the National Book Award finalist, “Never Caught: The Washingtons’ Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge” by Erica Armstrong Dunbar and several New York Times bestsellers, including “Tough Love: My Story of the Things Worth Fighting For” by Susan Rice “The Butler: A Witness to History” by Wil Haygood “The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl” by Issa Rae and “I Can’t Make This Up” by Kevin Hart.

“A proven trailblazer in publishing and known for her innovative approach, Dawn’s ability to find emerging voices and give them the platforms to transform our society is unparalleled,” Condé Nast CEO Roger Lynch said. “As she joins Bon Appétit with one of the most passionate and engaged audiences in the culinary world, it’s thrilling to think about how our relationship with food will be enhanced through her leadership and vision.”

Davis will report to longtime Vogue editrix Anna Wintour, who also serves as artistic director of Condé Nast U.S. and global content advisor for the company. The media giant also publishes The New Yorker, GQ and Vanity Fair.

“Dawn’s work stands out for defining and leading important cultural conversations,” Wintour said with the announcement. “She is a trusted voice and supporter of a diverse and inclusive community of writers and she has shone a light on people and stories that need to be told. I am so pleased that she will bring her considerable talent to Bon Appétit.”

A native of Los Angeles, Davis will be one of very few Black people to ever helm a Condé Nast publication. The first was Keija Minor, the editor in chief of Brides from 2012 to 2017.


Following racism controversy, Bon Appétit names top ranking book editor Dawn Davis as its new editor-in-chief

One of the book publishing industry’s highest ranking Black executives is moving on to the magazine world.

Dawn Davis, the award-winning vice president and publisher of Simon & Schuster’s 37 Ink imprint has been named the new editor-in-chief of Bon Appétit.

According to the top culinary periodical’s publisher, Condé Nast, Davis will be responsible for the editorial vision of Bon Appétit and the company’s food brands Epicurious, Healthyish and Basically across digital, video, Over The Top advertising, social and print platforms.

The appointment follows the June resignation of longtime editor in chief Adam Rapoport after photos surfaced of him in brownface at a 2013 party, amid accusations that the magazine only pays white editors for video appearances – a claim that Conde Nast vehemently denied.

On June 10, the company apologized and committed to creating change following the racism allegations.

In a public statement titled “A Long-Overdue Apology, and Where We Go From Here,” the company promised to prioritize people of color for consideration for the editor in chief position left open by Rapoport’s departure.

It also committed to anti-racism training for the staff and to resolve pay inequities.

Bon Appétit also said it will hire more freelancers of color.

Davis, who’s scheduled to start working Nov. 2, has worked in book publishing for more than 25 years and founded the 37 Ink imprint in 2013, with a focus on shining light on marginalized voices.

Some of her bestselling and award-winning titles include “Heads of the Colored People” by Nafissa Thompson-Spires, winner of a 2019 Whiting Award the National Book Award finalist, “Never Caught: The Washingtons’ Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge” by Erica Armstrong Dunbar and several New York Times bestsellers, including “Tough Love: My Story of the Things Worth Fighting For” by Susan Rice “The Butler: A Witness to History” by Wil Haygood “The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl” by Issa Rae and “I Can’t Make This Up” by Kevin Hart.

“A proven trailblazer in publishing and known for her innovative approach, Dawn’s ability to find emerging voices and give them the platforms to transform our society is unparalleled,” Condé Nast CEO Roger Lynch said. “As she joins Bon Appétit with one of the most passionate and engaged audiences in the culinary world, it’s thrilling to think about how our relationship with food will be enhanced through her leadership and vision.”

Davis will report to longtime Vogue editrix Anna Wintour, who also serves as artistic director of Condé Nast U.S. and global content advisor for the company. The media giant also publishes The New Yorker, GQ and Vanity Fair.

“Dawn’s work stands out for defining and leading important cultural conversations,” Wintour said with the announcement. “She is a trusted voice and supporter of a diverse and inclusive community of writers and she has shone a light on people and stories that need to be told. I am so pleased that she will bring her considerable talent to Bon Appétit.”

A native of Los Angeles, Davis will be one of very few Black people to ever helm a Condé Nast publication. The first was Keija Minor, the editor in chief of Brides from 2012 to 2017.


Following racism controversy, Bon Appétit names top ranking book editor Dawn Davis as its new editor-in-chief

One of the book publishing industry’s highest ranking Black executives is moving on to the magazine world.

Dawn Davis, the award-winning vice president and publisher of Simon & Schuster’s 37 Ink imprint has been named the new editor-in-chief of Bon Appétit.

According to the top culinary periodical’s publisher, Condé Nast, Davis will be responsible for the editorial vision of Bon Appétit and the company’s food brands Epicurious, Healthyish and Basically across digital, video, Over The Top advertising, social and print platforms.

The appointment follows the June resignation of longtime editor in chief Adam Rapoport after photos surfaced of him in brownface at a 2013 party, amid accusations that the magazine only pays white editors for video appearances – a claim that Conde Nast vehemently denied.

On June 10, the company apologized and committed to creating change following the racism allegations.

In a public statement titled “A Long-Overdue Apology, and Where We Go From Here,” the company promised to prioritize people of color for consideration for the editor in chief position left open by Rapoport’s departure.

It also committed to anti-racism training for the staff and to resolve pay inequities.

Bon Appétit also said it will hire more freelancers of color.

Davis, who’s scheduled to start working Nov. 2, has worked in book publishing for more than 25 years and founded the 37 Ink imprint in 2013, with a focus on shining light on marginalized voices.

Some of her bestselling and award-winning titles include “Heads of the Colored People” by Nafissa Thompson-Spires, winner of a 2019 Whiting Award the National Book Award finalist, “Never Caught: The Washingtons’ Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge” by Erica Armstrong Dunbar and several New York Times bestsellers, including “Tough Love: My Story of the Things Worth Fighting For” by Susan Rice “The Butler: A Witness to History” by Wil Haygood “The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl” by Issa Rae and “I Can’t Make This Up” by Kevin Hart.

“A proven trailblazer in publishing and known for her innovative approach, Dawn’s ability to find emerging voices and give them the platforms to transform our society is unparalleled,” Condé Nast CEO Roger Lynch said. “As she joins Bon Appétit with one of the most passionate and engaged audiences in the culinary world, it’s thrilling to think about how our relationship with food will be enhanced through her leadership and vision.”

Davis will report to longtime Vogue editrix Anna Wintour, who also serves as artistic director of Condé Nast U.S. and global content advisor for the company. The media giant also publishes The New Yorker, GQ and Vanity Fair.

“Dawn’s work stands out for defining and leading important cultural conversations,” Wintour said with the announcement. “She is a trusted voice and supporter of a diverse and inclusive community of writers and she has shone a light on people and stories that need to be told. I am so pleased that she will bring her considerable talent to Bon Appétit.”

A native of Los Angeles, Davis will be one of very few Black people to ever helm a Condé Nast publication. The first was Keija Minor, the editor in chief of Brides from 2012 to 2017.


Following racism controversy, Bon Appétit names top ranking book editor Dawn Davis as its new editor-in-chief

One of the book publishing industry’s highest ranking Black executives is moving on to the magazine world.

Dawn Davis, the award-winning vice president and publisher of Simon & Schuster’s 37 Ink imprint has been named the new editor-in-chief of Bon Appétit.

According to the top culinary periodical’s publisher, Condé Nast, Davis will be responsible for the editorial vision of Bon Appétit and the company’s food brands Epicurious, Healthyish and Basically across digital, video, Over The Top advertising, social and print platforms.

The appointment follows the June resignation of longtime editor in chief Adam Rapoport after photos surfaced of him in brownface at a 2013 party, amid accusations that the magazine only pays white editors for video appearances – a claim that Conde Nast vehemently denied.

On June 10, the company apologized and committed to creating change following the racism allegations.

In a public statement titled “A Long-Overdue Apology, and Where We Go From Here,” the company promised to prioritize people of color for consideration for the editor in chief position left open by Rapoport’s departure.

It also committed to anti-racism training for the staff and to resolve pay inequities.

Bon Appétit also said it will hire more freelancers of color.

Davis, who’s scheduled to start working Nov. 2, has worked in book publishing for more than 25 years and founded the 37 Ink imprint in 2013, with a focus on shining light on marginalized voices.

Some of her bestselling and award-winning titles include “Heads of the Colored People” by Nafissa Thompson-Spires, winner of a 2019 Whiting Award the National Book Award finalist, “Never Caught: The Washingtons’ Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge” by Erica Armstrong Dunbar and several New York Times bestsellers, including “Tough Love: My Story of the Things Worth Fighting For” by Susan Rice “The Butler: A Witness to History” by Wil Haygood “The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl” by Issa Rae and “I Can’t Make This Up” by Kevin Hart.

“A proven trailblazer in publishing and known for her innovative approach, Dawn’s ability to find emerging voices and give them the platforms to transform our society is unparalleled,” Condé Nast CEO Roger Lynch said. “As she joins Bon Appétit with one of the most passionate and engaged audiences in the culinary world, it’s thrilling to think about how our relationship with food will be enhanced through her leadership and vision.”

Davis will report to longtime Vogue editrix Anna Wintour, who also serves as artistic director of Condé Nast U.S. and global content advisor for the company. The media giant also publishes The New Yorker, GQ and Vanity Fair.

“Dawn’s work stands out for defining and leading important cultural conversations,” Wintour said with the announcement. “She is a trusted voice and supporter of a diverse and inclusive community of writers and she has shone a light on people and stories that need to be told. I am so pleased that she will bring her considerable talent to Bon Appétit.”

A native of Los Angeles, Davis will be one of very few Black people to ever helm a Condé Nast publication. The first was Keija Minor, the editor in chief of Brides from 2012 to 2017.